May 6, 2022 | NEWS | By Will Sylvain | Photo by Sydney Morris

It’s been almost seven blocks since the ribbon was cut at Ed Robson Arena, beginning a new era for Colorado College hockey: backed by an enthusiastic board, opposed by concerned community members.

The student body was the first to criticize the massive project, but were ensured that it was not just a fancy upgrade to the hockey program. Now, seven months later, The Catalyst set out to get the scoop on the arena and take a look at what’s in store for the future.

From the beginning, Ed Robson Arena was meant to be more than just a hockey stadium. Not only did it aim to become a new home for student resources, the project hoped to create a multifaceted space capable of bringing the community together.

Colin Bailey, executive director of Ed Robson Arena, said to The Catalyst in October of last year, “Projects always evolve, first and foremost. Building a practice facility is a lot of money, and when you look at what you can do with just a little bit more money … that’s when things start to take off.”

What were once blueprints for a practice facility became a campus landmark –– a facility that can host an art show and a game against Air Force in the same weekend.

In the arena’s inaugural year, nine different opponents took the ice with the Tigers. The team got their first Ed Robson win in late October, routing Air Force 8-1 with the support of an electric Saturday night student section.

But there were some magical off-ice moments, too. A campus favorite this year was Arts at the Arena, which gave CC students who don’t play Division 1 hockey a chance to showcase their talent in Robson. The event boasted a four-contestant “battle of the bands,” with student groups competing for the opportunity to play at CC’s music festival “Llamapalooza.” After the music came a drag show, drawing even more students and community members in through the arena doors.

Other events in Robson arena this year included an admitted student open house, a holiday staff party, and an induction ceremony for the CC Athletics Hall of Fame.

Elizabeth Clark, the associate director of Ed Robson arena, said this mix of on- and off-ice events is exactly what the $54 million venue was built for.

“It’s great to have hockey games, Clark said, “but we want to have as much going on as we can in here. We want to have people come from all over, because we think it’s pretty special, and we want everybody else to be able to experience that, too.” According to Clark, the staff at Robson have been pleased with the diversity of events this year.

And the year isn’t over yet. Summer plans for Ed Robson Arena have been in the works since the ribbon cutting, and directors are excited to keep showcasing the space in the coming months.

Kicking off the summer at the arena will be CC’s 2022 Commencement ceremony, celebrating and honoring this year’s graduating class.

Also on the docket are fundraisers, seminars led by President Richardson, and youth hockey camps and tournaments, including the Five Nations Tournament. According to Clark, it will bring spectators and players from across the U.S., as well as Germany, the Czech-Republic, Switzerland, and Slovakia.

But apparently that’s a light schedule. Clark says future summers at Robson will be even busier, as contracts come in and partnerships grow.

One of these partnerships is with is City For Champions, or C4C, an organization dedicated to bringing recognition to Colorado Springs as a flagship city in American athletics. The Sports Corp of Colorado Springs, which put on the Labor Day hot air balloon launch, have also expressed interest in partnering with the arena for their events.

“There’s a lot of interest on both the ice side of things and the non-ice side of things, so that’s really encouraging,” Clark said.

She also mentioned that her favorite part of the job is partnering with Amy Hill, CC’s Director of Campus Activities, because she loves getting students involved in the space.

The beloved Wooglin’s deli may be gone, but Clark and the other staff at Robson are working hard to keep giving students a reason to make the trek to the south side of campus.

Ed Robson Roundup

By Will Sylvain

It’s been almost seven blocks since the ribbon was cut at Ed Robson Arena, beginning a new era for Colorado College hockey: backed by an enthusiastic board, opposed by concerned community members.

The student body was the first to criticize the massive project, but were ensured that it was not just a fancy upgrade to the hockey program. Now, seven months later, The Catalyst set out to get the scoop on the arena and take a look at what’s in store for the future.

From the beginning, Ed Robson Arena was meant to be more than just a hockey stadium. Not only did it aim to become a new home for student resources, the project hoped to create a multifaceted space capable of bringing the community together.

Colin Bailey, executive director of Ed Robson Arena, said to The Catalyst in October of last year, “Projects always evolve, first and foremost. Building a practice facility is a lot of money, and when you look at what you can do with just a little bit more money … that’s when things start to take off.”

What were once blueprints for a practice facility became a campus landmark –– a facility that can host an art show and a game against Air Force in the same weekend.

In the arena’s inaugural year, nine different opponents took the ice with the Tigers. The team got their first Ed Robson win in late October, routing Air Force 8-1 with the support of an electric Saturday night student section.

But there were some magical off-ice moments, too. A campus favorite this year was Arts at the Arena, which gave CC students who don’t play Division 1 hockey a chance to showcase their talent in Robson. The event boasted a four-contestant “battle of the bands,” with student groups competing for the opportunity to play at CC’s music festival “Llamapalooza.” After the music came a drag show, drawing even more students and community members in through the arena doors.

Other events in Robson arena this year included an admitted student open house, a holiday staff party, and an induction ceremony for the CC Athletics Hall of Fame.

Elizabeth Clark, the associate director of Ed Robson arena, said this mix of on- and off-ice events is exactly what the $54 million venue was built for.

“It’s great to have hockey games, Clark said, “but we want to have as much going on as we can in here. We want to have people come from all over, because we think it’s pretty special, and we want everybody else to be able to experience that, too.” According to Clark, the staff at Robson have been pleased with the diversity of events this year.

And the year isn’t over yet. Summer plans for Ed Robson Arena have been in the works since the ribbon cutting, and directors are excited to keep showcasing the space in the coming months.

Kicking off the summer at the arena will be CC’s 2022 Commencement ceremony, celebrating and honoring this year’s graduating class.

Also on the docket are fundraisers, seminars led by President Richardson, and youth hockey camps and tournaments, including the Five Nations Tournament. According to Clark, it will bring spectators and players from across the U.S., as well as Germany, the Czech-Republic, Switzerland, and Slovakia.

But apparently that’s a light schedule. Clark says future summers at Robson will be even busier, as contracts come in and partnerships grow.

One of these partnerships is with is City For Champions, or C4C, an organization dedicated to bringing recognition to Colorado Springs as a flagship city in American athletics. The Sports Corp of Colorado Springs, which put on the Labor Day hot air balloon launch, have also expressed interest in partnering with the arena for their events.

“There’s a lot of interest on both the ice side of things and the non-ice side of things, so that’s really encouraging,” Clark said.

She also mentioned that her favorite part of the job is partnering with Amy Hill, CC’s Director of Campus Activities, because she loves getting students involved in the space.

The beloved Wooglin’s deli may be gone, but Clark and the other staff at Robson are working hard to keep giving students a reason to make the trek to the south side of campus.

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