Malcolm Perkins-Smith’s thesis will be exhibited in Cossitt Hall the first week of block 7.

Art by Malcolm Perkins-Smith
Art by Malcolm Perkins-Smith

His show will consist of a number of drawings and a series of etchings. Inspired by the ephemeral nature of time, Perkins-Smith explores the idea that “time,

like a cloud, is constantly changing; now will only exist right now.” Though we have memories of past moments in time, they are abstracted to some degree. Perkins-Smith explores the concepts of ambiguity and electiveness through his study of

clouds and their amorphous forms. From what I’ve seen of Perkins-Smith’s work, he has the makings for a dramatic and compelling show.

 

Free Snacks and Thesis Work, by Cindy Taylor, will be up in Packard Hall. Taylor has been working on a number of zinc etchings, most of which involve her kitchen. She loves cooking in her beat-up, old kitchen and aims to translate its character and wafting smells through her work. Meticulous fine lines create detailed renderings of her stove and sink as well as garlic and kale. She dabbles in layering different plates to create intriguing compositions that combine architectural scenes with organic forms of food. Transporting you to a beloved kitchen, Taylor’s sentimental show is one that will arouse the taste buds.

Art by Cindy Taylor
Art by Cindy Taylor

 

Daniel Alvarado’s show critiques socially constructed rationalism by giving a foreign context to familiar objects. Using reclaimed industrial construction materials, many of which he found on the site of El Pomar, Alvarado pursues his mission to “discombobulate” his viewers by displacing consumerism objects in such a way that forces people to “look harder” at them. Alvarado wants to move past rationalism, stating, “Nothing [rational] is interesting or human, in my opinion…Just because something doesn’t have a practical use, it’s not dead.” Come muse over Alvarado’s architectural sculptures, displayed in the Packard courtyard  first week of 7th block, and ask yourself, “Am I living too rationally?”

Art by Daniel Alvarado
Art by Daniel Alvarado

 

 

Art by Lila Pickus
Art by Lila Pickus

Lila Pickus has collected, explored, and experimented in her intricate senior show. She began with an attraction to organic processes acting upon inorganic items – for example, a decomposing building or rusted sheet of metal.  Collecting scraps of these deteriorating items and making molds and rubbings has allowed her to experiment with different patterns and textures. Pickus said her pieces are “totally about the process” and the exploration of what happens to digested items taken out of context, revealing unconventional beauty. Don’t miss her opening in the Johnson building, otherwise known as the old KRCC office.

 

Compiled by Grace Gahagan and Erin O’Neill

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